The Weight of Glory Second Edition- Heath McNease (2013)

click on image to listen to the entire album for free!

There are a lot of firsts in today’s post: first total album post, first hip-hop music post, and our first C.S. Lewis – themed post.  All very good things to initiate into Truth in Tunes.

Heath McNease is southern boy who somehow grew up on both Bob Dylan and N.W.A.  As Christ got a hold of his heart, his music stayed true to both his varietal styles and his deep faith in God.  One of those deepening influences on McNease has been C.S. Lewis.  So much so, that he made an entire album dedicated to Lewis’ written works.

This album is entirely creative and impressively comprehensive.  Most all of C.S. Lewis’ major works are represented on this 12 song collection.  From theological treatises such as Mere Christianity and Weight of Glory, to spiritual introspections such as A Grief Observed and Surprised By Joy, to fictional masterpieces such as Narnia and Perelandra…and many, many more.  Each tune is like a personal rap of the cliff-notes version of each book (or book character).

The album doesn’t stop offering there.  You can tell that Heath treasured this project because he made two versions of the album: the first edition captures his singer/song writer side and this second edition remixes the same genius with his hip hop nature (with the help of Greg LaFollette).  In addition, each song is eloquently explained through a brief video featuring Heath McNease on his Youtube channel.

I appreciate his energy and versatility in all of his music.  I also admire his generosity of offering his work to fans without price.  So, if you dig this drop, be sure to give him props (there, that’s my feeble attempt at rhyme).

Finally, a word about the works of C.S. Lewis put to music.  He was truly blessed with a great gift (much like our favorite musical artists) to deliver God’s truth to us in a special way.  He helped all of us see better – both the beauty of simply truths as well as the brilliance of complex doctrines.  Yet, one of his greater gifts was always this ability to be humble in the midst of his legacy.  He knew he was just a vessel for God’s glory and that he wasn’t perfect.

His other great gift was to remind his readers that our ultimate satisfaction can only be found in God.  Specifically, he helped me to see that all of life, good and bad, points forward and outside to a place and a time that true believers in Jesus constantly look to and long for.  This high hope is what holds us together while we’re here.  Thank you Lewis, for your writings and thank you Heath for your tunes.

“The books or the music in which we thought the beauty was located will betray us if we trust to them; it was not in them, it only came through them,and what came through them was longing.

These things—the beauty, the memory of our own past—are good images of what we really desire; but if they are mistaken for the thing itself they turn into dumb idols,breaking the hearts of their worshippers.

For they are not the thing itself; they are only the scent of a flower we have not found, the echo of a tune we have not heard, news from a country we have never yet visited.”  – C.S. Lewis, The Weight of Glory

O Sacred Head, Page CXVI (2012, B-Sides)

click on image to listen to song for free.

Passion/Resurrection theme continues this week with a powerful old/new number addressing the awful reason why Christ had to die in the first place: us.

Page CXVI is a trio endeavoring to revive old hymns with new musical life.  Their style is one of simplicity and a little shoe-gazing, but beautiful for sure.  Their name?  Well, in their own words, “We got our name from C.S. Lewis’ Chronicles of Narnia in The Magician’s Nephew. Page 116 in the book (CXVI in roman numerals) is where Aslan begins to sing Narnia into creation. Melody being the driving force behind creation really resonated with us, and we stuck with it!”  Perfect!

“O Sacred Head” was originally a passion hymn from the Dark (or Middle) Ages.  I guess a few things good did come out of such a bleak time period.  The old text has many more verses and “Thees” and “Thous”, but the gist of the lyrics is captured by Page CXVI here:

O sacred Head, now wounded, with grief and shame weighed down,
Now scornfully surrounded with thorns, Thine only crown;
How pale art Thou with anguish, with sore abuse and scorn!
Oh how Your face bends solemn, which once was bright as morn!

Men mock and taunt and jeer Thee, Thou noble countenance,
Though mighty worlds shall fear Thee and flee before Thy glance.
Grim death, with cruel rigor, hath robbed Thee of Thy life;                                                Thus Thou hast lost Thy vigor, Thy strength in this sad strife.

You bled by our hands, You bled!

My burdens You have carried, my sins you have borne,
For it was my transgression which brought this worldly scorn.
I cast me down before Thee, wrath – my rightful lot;
But You have sweet mercy, Redeemer by the cross.

You bled by our hands, You bled for me, for you, for us!

A strikingly personal and hard-edged psalm contemplating the all too well known fact that we (humanity) literally put Jesus on the cross.  Sometimes, we get desensitized by this reality because we’ve heard about it over and over again.  Our numbness grows with each Easter season, and yet reality has never changed…not for the last 2,000 some years.

It is good and fitting and horribly difficult to really meditate on this truth: God bled for us and by our hands.  Isaiah 53 is exactly what our hearts need in order to properly dwell on exactly what Jesus did for us and what we did to Him:

Who has believed our message?
    To whom has the Lord revealed his powerful arm?
My servant grew up in the Lord’s presence like a tender green shoot,
    like a root in dry ground.
There was nothing beautiful or majestic about his appearance,
    nothing to attract us to him.
He was despised and rejected—
    a man of sorrows, acquainted with deepest grief.
We turned our backs on him and looked the other way.
    He was despised, and we did not care.

Yet it was our weaknesses he carried;
    it was our sorrows[a] that weighed him down.
And we thought his troubles were a punishment from God,
    a punishment for his own sins!
But he was pierced for our rebellion,
    crushed for our sins.
He was beaten so we could be whole.
    He was whipped so we could be healed.
All of us, like sheep, have strayed away.
    We have left God’s paths to follow our own.
Yet the Lord laid on him
    the sins of us all.

He was oppressed and treated harshly,
    yet he never said a word.
He was led like a lamb to the slaughter.
    And as a sheep is silent before the shearers,
    he did not open his mouth.
Unjustly condemned,
    he was led away.[b]
No one cared that he died without descendants,
    that his life was cut short in midstream.[c]
But he was struck down
    for the rebellion of my people.
He had done no wrong
    and had never deceived anyone.
But he was buried like a criminal;
    he was put in a rich man’s grave.

10 But it was the Lord’s good plan to crush him
    and cause him grief.
Yet when his life is made an offering for sin,
    he will have many descendants.
He will enjoy a long life,
    and the Lord’s good plan will prosper in his hands.
11 When he sees all that is accomplished by his anguish,
    he will be satisfied.
And because of his experience,
    my righteous servant will make it possible
for many to be counted righteous,
    for he will bear all their sins.
12 I will give him the honors of a victorious soldier,
    because he exposed himself to death.
He was counted among the rebels.
    He bore the sins of many and interceded for rebels.

Yes, Easter is several weeks away.  However, we are not able anymore to just think upon these things and be impacted by them as we should be.  Remember, we are numb.  Therefore, let Lent season serve it’s purpose.  Begin thinking now about the cross by meditating on Christ’s suffering and focus on why He had to endure all that He did.

Imagining the Sacred Head of God’s Son with a crown of thorns and a countenance of ultimate anguish is where we need to start this process of getting all the way through to the empty tomb.  Don’t pass over what is the absolute center of the cross, Easter and the Gospel itself: God died for sinners.  God died.  He bled by our hands…